Contributors

Adam David Morton is Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.
Dr Adam Fishwick is a Senior Lecturer in Urban Studies and Public Policy in the Department of Politics and Public Policy at De Montfort University, Leicester. His research focuses on the relationship between labour and development in Latin America, exploring the centrality of work and workplace resistance to the constitution of firm- and state-led development strategies. He is interested, also, in alternative forms of development and radical politics in the region and beyond.
Adrienne Roberts is a lecturer in International Politics at the University of Manchester. Her work, which focuses on feminist political economy, social reproduction, debt and finance, has been published in journals that include the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Critical Sociology and Global Society. She is co-editor of the Handbook of the International Political Economy of Gender (forthcoming with Edward Elgar) and co-editor of the Rowman & Littlefield International book series ‘Global Political Economies of Gender and Sexuality’.
Aida Hozic is Associate Professor of International Relations and 2015-2016 Colonel Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Science, University of Florida. She is the author of Hollyworld: Space, Power and Fantasy in the American Economy (Cornell, 2002) and numerous articles situated at the intersection of international political economy, cultural studies and international security. Jacqui True is Professor of Politics and International Relations and an Australian Rsearch Council Future Fellow in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University, Australia. She is the author of The Political Economy of Violence against Women (New York: Oxford University) awarded the American Political Science Association's 2012 prize for the best book in human rights and the BISA International Political Economy Group best book in 2013.
Ainsley Elbra is a researcher in the field of international political economy. Her research is concerned with globalisation, private governance, business-state relations and natural resource politics. She has a monograph titled, Governing African Gold Mining: Private Governance and the Resource Curse, in press with Palgrave Macmillan and is currently leading a research project on multinational corporate tax avoidance, focusing on voluntary governance solutions and firms’ responses to calls for greater tax transparency. In 2015 she was awarded the Australian International Political Economy Network’s Richard Higgott Journal Article Prize.
Alejandro De Coss is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at the London School of Economics. His current research is an exploration on the role of infrastructure in the urbanisation of water in Mexico City over the course of the 20th Century.
Alex Callinicos is Professor of European Studies at King’s College London and editor of International Socialism. His books include The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx, Making History, Social Theory, An Anti-Capitalist Manifesto, The Resources of Critique, Imperialism and Global Political Economy, Bonfire of Illusions, and Deciphering Capital.
Alex Sutton is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Chichester. His research is concerned with the theoretical and historical study of imperialism, looking in particular at 20th Century British imperialism and the intellectual history of the study of imperialism.
Alexander Anievas is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of Capital, the State, and War: Class Conflict and Geopolitics in the Thirty Years’ Crisis, 1914-1945 (University of Michigan Press, 2014), for which he was awarded the Sussex International Theory Prize, and co-author (with Kerem Nişancıoğlu) of How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism (Pluto, 2015). He has also (co-)edited and contributed to: Historical Sociology and World History: Uneven and Combined Development over the Longue Durée (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016), with Kamran Matin; Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (Routledge, 2015), with Nivi Manchanda and Robbie Shilliam; and, Cataclysm 1914: The First World War and the Making of Modern World Politics (Brill Press, 2015).
Alexander Gallas is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Kassel, and one of the editors of the Global Labour Journal. He has a PhD and an MA in Sociology, both from the University of Lancaster, and a Magister Artium in Philosophy from FU Berlin. In his monograph The Thatcherite Offensive: A Neo-Poulantzasian Analysis (Brill, 2015), he analyses the reorganisation of class relations under the Conservative governments in Britain in the 1980s and 1990s.
Alf Gunvald Nilsen is Associate Professor at the Department of Global Development Studies and Planning at the University of Agder and Research Associate at the Society, Work and Development Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand.
Alfredo Saad-Filho has degrees in Economics from the Universities of Brasilia (Brazil) and London (SOAS). He has worked in universities and research institutions based in Brazil, Canada, Japan, Mozambique, Switzerland and the UK, and was a senior economic affairs officer at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). His research interests include the political economy of development, industrial policy, neoliberalism, alternative economic policies, Latin American political and economic development, inflation and stabilisation, and the labour theory of value and its applications.
Ali Rıza Güngen is a researcher in international political economy. He received the Young Social Scientist award from the Turkish Social Sciences Association in 2013. He is the co-author of the 2014 book Financialization, debt crisis and collapse (in Turkish) and coedited the special issue of Praksis journal on indebtedness in Turkey (2015). His research currently focuses on sovereign debt management, state restructuring and financial inclusion.
Professor (Public Policy), Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney.
Andreas Bieler is Professor of Political Economy at the University of Nottingham and Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ).
Andrew Hindmoor joined the Department in 2013 as a Professor of Politics and is currently the Deputy Head of the Department. Andrew Hindmoor joined the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield in 2013 as a Professor of Politics and is currently the Deputy Head of the Department. Andrew completed a PhD at the London School of Economics in 1996. He has lectured at the London School of Economics, Durham University, the University of Exeter and the University of Queensland in Australia. Prior to moving to Sheffield he was Associate Dean of Research at the Faculty of Social Science in the University of Queensland.
Anitra Nelson is an activist scholar, currently a Carson Fellow at the Rachel Carson Centre for Environment and Society of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, author of Marx’s Concept of Money: The God of Commodities (1999), co-editor of Life Without Money: Building Fair and Sustainable Economies (2011, Pluto Press) and Honorary Associate Professor at RMIT University’s Centre for Urban Research.
Activist and social theorist, Ariel Salleh has worked at the interface of socialist, feminist, indigenous, and ecological politics for several decades. She is a Research Associate in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney; Visiting Professor in Culture, Philosophy and Environment at Nelson Mandela University; and Senior Fellow in Post-Growth Societies at Friedrich Schiller University Jena.
Bill Dunn works in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. His principal research interests are in the contemporary global political economy of labour, crises, international trade and Marxism.
Brecht De Smet (MA, PhD) is a researcher and lecturer at the Department of Conflict and Development Studies, Ghent University, where he teaches 'politics of globalisation' and 'politics of the contemporary Middle East'. Since 2008 De Smet has conducted fieldwork in Egypt, investigating the relation between political activism and independent trade unionism from a broad Gramscian perspective. De Smet has written on the workers' movement, the concepts of hegemony and passive revolution, political pedagogy, and social and political protest in Egypt. His recent books are "A Dialectical Pedagogy of Revolt. Gramsci, Vygotsky, and the Egyptian Revolution" (Brill, 2015) and "Gramsci on Tahrir. Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Egypt" (Pluto Press, 2016).
Brett Heino is a researcher in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts at the University of Wollongong.
Bruno Dobrusin works at the Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Laborales (CONICET) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is also Advisor to the Central de Trabajadores de la Argentina (CTA: Argentine Workers' Confederation).
Cameron Smith is a writer, musician, and doctoral researcher at Macquarie University, Sydney. His research interests centre around political economy, race and racism, and multiculturalism. He tweets at @cmrnsmth and more of his work can be found on his website: http://www.cmrnsmth.com
Cemal Burak Tansel is Anniversary Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield. He is the editor of States of Discipline: Authoritarian Neoliberalism and the Contested Reproduction of Capitalist Order (Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017) and has published peer-reviewed research articles in the European Journal of International Relations, Review of International Studies and Journal of International Relations and Development.
Charlotte Epstein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. She is currently writing a book on surveillance and power in International Relations. Her interests are in the areas of International Relations theory, particularly in post-structuralist approaches and discourse theory, critical security studies and global environmental politics, and she has published on these themes in International Organization, the European Journal of International Relations, and International Political Sociology, amongst others.
Chris Hesketh is a Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy. He received his BA, MA and PhD all from the University of Nottingham. Before joining Oxford Brookes in 2012 he taught at the University of Nottingham and at Birkbeck College, University of London. He has an inter-disciplinary research agenda that combines international political economy, the historical sociology of international relations, political geography, political theory and Latin American studies.
Christopher May is Professor of Political Economy and has been a senior academic manager at Lancaster University for the last nine years but is about to return to life as a ‘normal’ academic. Despite this he has written two books in the last five years: The Rule of Law: The Common Sense of Global Politics (Edward Elgar 2014) and Global Corporations in Global Governance (Routledge, Global Institutions Series, 2015), and is currently in the early stages of editing a Handbook on the Rule of Law to be published in 2017 by Edward Elgar.
Christopher Wright is Professor of Organisational Studies at the University of Sydney Business School. His current research explores organizational and societal responses to climate change, with a particular focus on how managers and business organizations interpret and respond to the climate crisis. He has published broadly in the area of critical management studies and is the author of Management as Consultancy: Neo-bureaucracy and the Consultant Manager (CUP 2015 with Andrew Sturdy & Nick Wylie) and Climate Change, Capitalism and Corporations (CUP 2015 with Daniel Nyberg).
Claire Parfitt is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. Claire practised industrial and anti-discrimination law before moving to the trade union movement as a researcher and campaigner. She has worked for Australian and international trade unions and the environment movement on various campaigns related to labour rights, food sovereignty and climate change. She is writing about pension funds, ethical investment and strategic questions that arise for social movements.
Damien Cahill is an academic and trade union activist based at the University of Sydney. His main area of research examines neoliberalism, in all its manifestations: theory, practice, history and contemporary debates. He also writes about capitalism as a social system (as distinct from orthodox economics which views the economy as separate from the state and other social institutions). Before entering academia, Damien worked variously as a shop assistant, labourer and political adviser, and spent several periods of time on the dole. He lives in Sydney with his partner and two daughters. In his free time, he runs.
Daniela Tepe-Belfrage is a Lecturer in Politics at the University of Sheffield. She currently holds a Faculty of Social Science Research Fellowship. Her research is concerned with Feminist Political Economy, Critical Theory, Austerity, British Politics, Politics of Caring and Parenting. Her research has been published as a monograph with Palgrave Macmillan and in journals that include International Politics, Public Administration, Review of International Political Economy and Capital & Class. She is the co-editor of a forthcoming Special Issue on Inequality and Insecurity in British Household in British Politics and the forthcoming Handbook on Gender in World Politics with Edward Elgar.
David M. Bell is the Research Associate on and Co-ordinator of the 'Imaginaries of the Future: Historicizing the Present' Leverhulme International Research Network, based in the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at Newcastle University, UK.
David Harvie teaches and researches on finance, political economy and social movements. He’s a member of the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy, based in Leicester, UK, and of The Free Association writing collective (whose book Moments of Excess: Movements, Protest and Everyday Life was published by PM Press).
David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame and former editor (from 1997 to 2009) of the journal Rethinking Marxism. His most recent book is Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis (New York: Routledge, 2010). He is currently working on two book manuscripts: "Utopia and Critique" and "What's the Matter with Exploitation." His blog, Occasional Links & Commentary on Economics, Culture, and Society, can be found at http://anticap.wordress.com.
Diarmuid Maguire grew up in Northern Ireland, BA University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, MA Johns Hopkins University Bologna, PhD Cornell University. Currently at the University of Sydney. My interests are in European and international politics, social movements and protest movements. I research on the interaction between movements and state authorities in Northern Ireland and Israel/Palestine.
Efe Can Gürcan (M.A. in International Studies, University of Montréal) is a PhD student in sociology at Simon Fraser University, and holds a SSHRC-Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship. His research interests lie in the areas of Marxism, political sociology (social movements and the state), Latin America (Cuba, Venezuela, Argentina), food studies, and Turkish politics and society.
Elizabeth Hill is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy and co-convenor of the Australian Work and Family Policy Roundtable.
Elizabeth is a Scholarly Teaching Fellow in Social & Political Sciences, within the Communications program, based in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, at the University of Technology Sydney.
Ericka Beckman is Associate Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania. She is author of Capital Fictions: The Literature of Latin America's Export Age (University of Minnesota Press, 2013), and is currently writing a book on capitalism and rural societies in 20th-century Latin American literature.
Ertan Erol currently works as a Research Assistant in the Department of Politics and International Relations of the Faculty of Political Sciences in Istanbul University. His main research area is the formation and transformation of state-society relations in Mexico and he is currently working on Mexican social movements in urban and rural contexts.
Ewald Engelen is Professor of Financial Geography at the University of Amsterdam. His research focuses mainly on the post-crisis politics of financial reform. He co-authored After the Great Complacence: Financial Crisis and the Politics of Reform. His latest writings have been on the European Commission's attempt to set up a Capital Markets Union. He doubles as a public intellectual in the Netherlands.
Fiona Allon is Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. She is a member of the Social Studies of Finance Research Network and her current research focuses on cultures of financial calculation in the everyday life of households, specifically in relation to the interface between home/housing, mortgage and financial markets. She is the author of Renovation Nation: Our Obsession with Home (UNSW Press, 2008) and writes on contemporary culture, economy and politics.
Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Sydney, co-ordinating editor of the Journal of Australian Political Economy (JAPE), and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.
Franklin Obeng-Odoom is a Senior Lecturer in Property Economics at the School of Built Environment and a member of the Asia Pacific Centre for Complex Real Property Rights at the University of Technology Sydney. His research interests are centred on the political economy of development, cities and natural resources (specifically water, oil, and land).
Fred Block is Research Professor of Sociology at the University of California at Davis. His recent work has focused on documenting the substantial role that the U.S. government plays in technology development across the civilian economy. During the last thirty years while policymakers and pundits were singing the praises of "free markets", the reality was that the public sector significantly expanded its efforts to move research breakthroughs from the laboratory to the market. His book, State of Innovation: The U.S. Government's Role in Technology Development, co-edited with Matthew R. Keller (Paradigm Publishers) contains a series of case studies that document different dimensions of this recently constructed innovation system. His book , The Power of Market Fundamentalism: Karl Polanyi’s Critique, is written with Margaret R. Somers and published by Harvard Press. This book seeks to explain and critique the market fundamentalist worldview that has dominated our politics for the last thirty years. His current research centers on the kinds of financial reforms and new institutions required to supports innovation in this new context of public-private collaboration. His earlier books include The Origins of International Economic Disorder (1977), Postindustrial Possibilities (1990), and The Vampire State(1996).
Gabriel Hetland is assistant professor of Latin American, Caribbean, and US Latino Studies at University at Albany, SUNY. His writings on Venezuelan politics, participatory democracy, capitalism, labor, and social movements have appeared in Qualitative Sociology, Work, Employment and Society, Latin American Perspectives, Jacobin, The Nation, NACLA, and elsewhere.
Gareth Bryant is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.
Gerardo Otero is Professor of International Studies and sociology at Simon Fraser University. Author of Farewell to the Peasantry? Political Class Formation in Rural Mexico (Westview 1999), he has published numerous scholarly articles, chapters and books about the political economy of agriculture and food, civil society and the state in Mexico and Latin America. His latest article (2015) is “The Neoliberal Diet and Inequality in the United States,” published in Social Science & Medicine.
Dr Gorkem Altinors is a member of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at the School of Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham. His doctoral thesis critically analyses the convergence of political Islam and neoliberalism in Turkey by constructing a Gramscian historical materialist account of neoliberal restructuring in Turkey during the Justice and Development Party (AKP) era, with a specific focus on the cases of urbanisation, education, and the mass media.
Graham Harrison is Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield. His core research interest is the political economy of capitalist development in Africa.
Dr Heather Watkins is a Lecturer in Politics at Nottingham Trent University. Her academic interests focus on localism and decentralised politics in the UK, seen as responses to broader political crises and discourses. She has written on the impact of neoliberal and “Third Way” logics on post-industrial communities and understandings of citizenship, and on the development of political ethnography as a research methodology for capturing political agency. She also has a parallel research interest in pedagogy and the use of internationalisation to foster critically-engaged perspectives in students.
Life Fellow, School of Politics and International Studies (POLIS), University of Leeds and 2008 winner of the Daniel Singer Millennium Prize for his essay '1968 and the Idea of Socialism' (see: http://www.danielsinger.org/).
Ian Bruff is Lecturer in European Politics at the University of Manchester, UK. He has published widely on capitalist diversity, neoliberalism, and social theory. He recently completed a large cross-country project on the diversity of contemporary capitalism(s) with Matthias Ebenau, Christian May and Andreas Nölke, which produced two German-language collections in 2013 (with Westfälisches Dampfboot and the journal Peripherie) plus an English-language special issue in 2014 (the journal Capital & Class) and an English-language volume in 2015 (with Palgrave Macmillan). He is currently researching the political economy of authoritarian neoliberalism in Europe, and is the Managing Editor of the Transforming Capitalism book series published by Rowman & Littlefield International.
Isla Pawson is an Honours Student in Political Economy at the University of Sydney with a secondary major in History. Her current research interests are the political power of economic ideas and interests, the role of the state in economic change, and the history of housing in Australia and beyond.
Ivan Ascher is the author of Portfolio Society: On the Capitalist Mode of Prediction (Zone Books, 2016)
Jack Copley is a PhD candidate at the University of Warwick, working within the ‘Rethinking the Market’ project. His research focuses on the relationship between financialisation and the struggles surrounding the exploitation of labour. More specifically, he is currently doing archival research at the UK Treasury, Bank of England and Confederation of British Industry to better grasp the expansion of the financial sector in the 1970s. He is the author of the activist handbook An Angry Person’s Guide to Finance (Red Pepper, 2014).
Jacqui True is Professor of Politics and International Relations, and Australian Research Council Future Fellow at Monash University, Australia. Her book The Political Economy of Violence Against Women (Oxford, 2012) won the 2012 American Political Science Association (APSA) biennial prize for the best book in human rights and the 2013 British International Studies Association (BISA) International Political Economy Group book prize.
Jamie Jordan is an ESRC PhD Candidate in the School of Politics & International Relations at the University of Nottingham. He is also a fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ).
Jim Stanford is a Canadian economist, recently arrived in Sydney. He worked for over 20 years as economist for the Canadian Auto Workers union (and its successor organization, Unifor), and is the author of Economics for Everyone: A Short Introduction to the Economics of Capitalism (second edition published in 2015 by Pluto Books in the U.K.). Jim now works for the Australia Institute, as Economist and Director of its new project, the Centre for Future Work. He is also an Honorary Professor in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.
Joe Collins is currently a sessional academic in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney and completed his PhD at Western Sydney University in 2016. His research offers a historical materialist critique of mineral-rent theory grounded in the historical development of the minerals industry and landed property in Australia.
Juanita Elias is Associate Professor in International Political Economy at the University of Warwick. Her research and teaching interests are in gendered approaches in IPE, labour migration, and the political economy of Southeast Asia. Recent work has appeared in the journals Globalizations, Asian Studies Review and International Political Sociology. She is co-editor with Lena Rethel of the forthcoming Cambridge University Press volume The Everyday Political Economy of Southeast Asia.
Katherine Dickson is an Honours Student in the Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney. She is undertaking a Bachelor of Political, Economic and Social Sciences. Her thesis topic concerns the nature of alienation in International Surrogacy. Her current research interests include feminism, post-colonial studies, internal relations and philosophies of exploitation.
Kerem Nisancioglu is Lecturer in International Relations at SOAS, University of London. His research focuses on Eurocentrism in international relations, and how this Eurocentrism can be subverted in both theory and history. In particular, his research has explored the ways in which non-European societies have been constitutive of European social relations in the early modern period. His current research seeks to uncover the international origins of whiteness as a form of social control. Kerem also blogs at The Disorder of Things.
Kevin Lin is a PhD candidate researching labour politics in China at the University of Technology, Sydney.
Laurence Cox co-directs the MA in Community Education, Equality and Social Activism at the National University of Ireland Maynooth and is a founding editor of Interface. Along with We Make Our Own History, he is co-editor of Marxism and Social Movements; Understanding European Movements: New Social Movements, Global Justice Struggles, Anti-Austerity Protest; and Silence Would be Treason: Last Writings of Ken Saro-Wiwa.
Leo Panitch is editor of the Socialist Register and distinguished research professor at York University, Canada. He is co-author, with Sam Gindin, of The Making of Global Capitalism: The Political Economy of American Empire (Verso)
Liam Stanley is Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield.
Lucia Pradella is Research Associate at SOAS, University of London, and teaches at the University of Venice Ca' Foscari. Her research is concerned with globalisation and the changing nature of labour and poverty. Her more recent publications include articles on migration and the working poor in Western Europe (Comparative European Politics and Competition & Change, 2015), and her latest monograph Globalization and the Critique of Political Economy: New Insights from Marx's Writings (Routledge, 2015). Lucia also co-edited Polarizing Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis (Pluto, 2015).
Luis F. Angosto-Ferrández lectures in anthropology and Latin American Studies at the University of Sydney. His recent publications include 'Venezuela Reframed: Bolivarianism, Indigenous Peoples and the Socialisms of the 21st Century' (Zed Books, 2015) and 'Democracy, Revolution and Geopolitics in Latin America: Venezuela and the International Politics of Discontent' (Routledge, 2014).
Luke researches alternative finance in China. Luke is a post-doctoral research associate with Political Economy at the University of Sydney and a Research Associate with the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance at the University of Cambridge Judge Business School. Luke’s post-doctoral research is funded by a grant from the Institute of New Economic Thinking (INET) for a project with Mike Beggs, Chris Jefferis and Yu Yuxin on the dynamics between financial innovation and central banking in China.
Marce Cameron recently completed a Master of Arts (Research) thesis, ‘Statist Utopianism and the Cuban Socialist Transition’, under the auspices of the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. As President of the University of Sydney Cuba-Venezuela Solidarity Club, he led the Cuba-Venezuela Youth and Students Revolutionary Tour in August 2010. His blog, Cuba's Socialist Renewal, features original translations and commentaries on the debates and changes underway in Cuba today. He is President of the Australia-Cuba Friendship Society (Sydney).
Marcus Taylor is an Associate Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University in Canada. His new book, The Political Ecology of Climate Change Adaptation: Livelihoods, Agrarian Change and the Conflicts of Development was published by Earthscan/Routledge in hardback and ebook versions. The author, however, has access to a special print run of paperback copies that he can make available for anyone wanting to purchase the book at a greatly reduced price!
Martijn Konings works in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. He is the author of The Development of American Finance (Cambridge University Press, 2011) as well as The Emotional Logic of Capitalism: What Progressives Have Missed (Stanford University Press, 2015). He is currently working on changing patterns of financial governance with specific reference to the role of the Federal Reserve.
Matthew Eagleton-Pierce is a Lecturer in International Political Economy at SOAS University of London. His research interests are within many areas of political economy, but particularly: 1) the history and contemporary forms of neoliberalism; and 2) the politics of world trade. His first monograph, Symbolic Power in the World Trade Organization, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013 and he is the author of Neoliberalism: The Key Concepts published by Routledge in 2016.
Matthew Ryan is a postgraduate research student in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. He was recently awarded the Frank Stilwell Award in Political Economy. He is currently working on the relationship between neoliberalism and democracy, with particular focus on the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Matthias Schmelzer is postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Social and Economic History at the University of Zürich, Switzerland, and he also works at the Leipzig-baded think tank Konzeptwerk Neue Ökonomie. He is author of "The Hegemony of Growth. The OECD and the Making of the Economic Growth Paradigm" (winner of the best dissertation prize by the World Economic History Congress (WEHC) 2015) and has written on 20th century social and economic history, monetary politics, international organizations, and degrowth. He is also active in various social movements and has recently been involved in organizing the international degrowth conference 2014 in Leipzig and the degrowth summer school in the Rhineland in 2015.
Maurizio Atzeni is a researcher based in Buenos Aires at the Center for Labour Relations, National Research Council of Argentina. He has written extensively on work and labour issues in articles and books published internationally. Among his recent publications is the book Workers and Labour in a Globalised Capitalism: theoretical themes and contemporary issues (Palgrave, 2013), in which work is analysed from the broader perspective of political economy.
Max Koch is a professor in social policy at Lund University. His previous publications include Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy Responses, Palgrave Macmillan (2012).
Mike Beggs is a Lecturer in Political Economy and on the editorial board of Jacobin. His book Inflation and the Making of Australian Macroeconomic Policy was published by Palgrave in 2015.
Paul Cammack graduated in English Literature in 1971, went to Chile (1971-3), got into studying and teaching Latin American and Third World Politics and shifted into global political economy, most recently at the University of Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University and City University Hong Kong. He is currently Honorary Professorial Research Fellow in the Global Development Institute, University of Manchester. Recent publications are available at https://manchester.academia.edu/PaulCammack, and recent book reviews at http://whatsworthreading.weebly.com.
Paul Mason is a writer, broadcaster and film-maker. He is the former Economics Editor For Channel 4 News and BBC 2's Newsnight programme and now writes a weekly column for the Guardian newspaper. He is the author of several books including the award-winning PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future (Penguin, 2016) and the best-seller Why It's Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions (Verso, 2013). His website is: http://www.paulmasonnews.com/.
Penny Griffin is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of New South Wales. In 2010 her book Gendering the World Bank won the British International Studies Association (BISA) International Political Economy Group book prize. Her latest book, Popular Culture, Political Economy and the Death of Feminism: Why Women are in Refrigerators and Other Stories is published with Routledge.
Philip Roberts is a final-year PhD candidate in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney, Australia, supervised by Professor Adam David Morton and Dr Damien Cahill. Phil was previously a fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at the University of Nottingham where he received his doctoral research training. His research is on Brazil and his thesis is entitled "The Landless Workers Movement of Brazil: Class Struggle and Ideological Formation."
Phillip Toner is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney. His research interests include industrial structure analysis and industry policy; the economics of technical change; national vocational skills formation systems and labour market analysis. He has undertaken research for organisations including the OECD; World Bank; Industry Canada; South African Human Sciences Research Council; Australian Research Council; National Centre for Vocational Education Research and Department of Innovation, Science and Research.
Robert is a Lecturer in International Relations at Coventry University. His research focuses on the theory and practice of statebuilding; contemporary Iraqi politics; and British foreign policy during the Blair era. His PhD thesis looked at the US-led reconstruction of the Iraqi state following the invasion in 2003. Ongoing research considers the development of the Iraqi state since regime change, with particular focus on the Kurdistan Regional Government. He first visited Iraq in 1993 and has maintained a close interest in its politics since then subsequently working for the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office within the Iraq Policy Unit in 2003-4, and in the private sector as a political and security analyst based in Erbil, Kurdistan in 2012-3.
Rodrigo Acuña is an Associate Lecturer in Spanish and Latin American Studies at the Department of International Studies at Macquarie University.
Rowan Cahill has worked as a teacher, freelance writer, agricultural labourer, and for the trade union movement as a journalist, historian, and rank and file activist. He is currently an Honorary Fellow with the Faculty of Law, Humanities & the Arts, at Wollongong University (NSW). Rowan has published extensively in labour movement, radical, and academic publications; his books include as co-author A History of the Seamen’s Union of Australia, 1872-1972 (1981), Twentieth Century Australia: Conflict and Consensus (1987); and as co-editor, A Turbulent Decade: Social Protest Movements and the Labour Movement, 1965-1975, (2005). His most recent book is Radical Sydney (co-authored with Terry Irving). Cahill and Irving blog at ‘Radical Sydney/Radical History’.
Sabrina Fernandes has a PhD in Sociology (with a specialisation in Political Economy) from Carleton University (Canada) and is currently a Full Collaborating Researcher at the University of Brasília. She is an activist in the Brazilian radical left focused on leftist strategy, eco-socialism, and feminist and right to the city struggles.
Samuel Knafo is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Sussex. His research is on liberal financial governance, which has led to the book entitled the Making of Modern Finance that received the 2014 International Political Economy Group book prize of the British International Studies Assocation. His main project now is to develop a social history of financialisation tracing the political and social struggles around key financial developments in the United States, which radically transformed the global financial system.
Sara C. Motta is a mother, critical theorist, and popular educator committed to reimagining in praxis emancipations. Her most recent books include “Education and Social Change in the Americas”, and “21st Century Socialism: The Role of Radical Education,” (with Mike Cole) both published by Palgrave Macmillan. She is senior lecturer in politics at the University of Newcastle in Australia, and is currently working on the manuscript “Liminal Subjects: Weaving our Liberation”, a decolonial feminist visioning of emancipation.
Sébastien Rioux is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia, Canada and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Manchester
Shahar Hameiri is Associate Professor of International Politics at Murdoch University. His book with Lee Jones, Governing Borderless Threats: Non-Traditional Security and the Politics of State Transformation, is available from Cambridge University Press.
Stuart Rosewarne’s research and teaching interests are in environmental and ecological economics, critical socialist ecology, international political economy, and the political economy of gender.
Sujatha Fernandes is Professor of Political Economy and Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney.
Susanne Soederberg is a Professor of Global Political Economy at Queen's University, Canada. She has recently been appointed as the Jane and Aatos Erkko Professorship at the Collegium for Advanced Studies at the University of Helsinki for the 2015-2016 academic year. Susanne is author of several books including The Politics of the New International Financial Architecture (Zed Books, 2004), Global Governance in Question (Pluto Books, 2006), and Corporate Power in Contemporary Capitalism (Routledge, 2010). She is currently working on a project that explores the geography of housing finance and debt relations among slum-dwellers in Manila, Mexico City and Mumbai.
Sydney Calkin is based in the Geography Department at Durham University, where she researches and teaches in the areas of feminist political economy and global development governance. Her writing has appeared in Third World Quarterly, Globalizations, and International Feminist Journal of Politics.
Tim Di Muzio is lecturer in International Relations and public policy at the University of Wollongong. His research is guided by two main agendas. In the first agenda, his interests lie at the intersection between the history of market civilisation, global capitalism and questions related to energy, the environment and global social reproduction. In the second agenda, his interests lie at the intersection between war, racism and liberal forms of rule in the making of world order.
Tom Barnes is a postdoctoral research fellow at the newly-established Institute for Religion, Politics and Society at the Australian Catholic University. He did his PhD in Political Economy at the University of Sydney. His new book, Informal Labour in Urban India: Three Cities, Three Journeys, is out with Routledge in early 2015. He blogs at http://tombarnes.info/.
Tom Chodor is a UQ Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. His research interests are in the areas of international political economy, international relations and globalisation. In particular, he is interested in the struggles over consent and hegemony within the neoliberal world order, and the transformative possibilities that emerge from such struggles. He is the author of Neoliberal Hegemony and the Pink Tide in Latin America: Breaking Up with TINA? (Palgrave, 2015).
Troy Henderson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney. His research topic examines the case for a Basic Income in Australia. In 2014 he completed his Masters of Arts (Research) on the Four-Day Workweek.
Yanis Varoufakis read mathematics and economics at the Universities of Essex and Birmingham and subsequently taught economics at the Universities of East Anglia, Cambridge, Sydney, Glasgow, Texas and Athens where he still holds a Chair in Political Economy and Economic Theory. He is the author of a number of books, including The Global Minotaur: America, Europe and the Future of the World Economy. His next book, to be published in April 2016 by Penguin-Random House, is entitled: And the Weak Suffer What They Must? Europe, Austerity and the Threat to Global Stability. Varoufakis was, in his own words, “thrust onto the public scene by Europe’s inane handling of an inevitable crisis”. In January 2015 he was elected to Greece's Parliament with the largest majority in the country and served as Greece’s Finance Minister (January to July 2015). During his term he experienced first hand the authoritarian inefficiency of the European Union’s institutions and had to negotiate with the Eurogroup, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund. His stint in government ended when he refused to sign a loan agreement that condemned Greece to yet another calamitous debt-deflationary cycle.
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